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Maternal and Child Health

World Vision is committed to improving the health and nutrition of women and children in the areas in which it works, contributing to the global reduction of under-five and maternal mortality. Good health is the foundation of a child’s life. We aim to ensure mothers and children are well nourished, protected from infection and disease, and have good access to essential health services.

Media Contacts:

Laura Blank

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Subject Matter Experts:

Martha Newsome

The Latest

Up to the minute news, press releases, media and more.

Mar 31, 2015

Community volunteers bring comfort and support to HIV- or AIDS- afflicted neighbors

Domingos Danca spends his days and nights lying outside on a mat covered by a rotten mosquito net, his body too weak to even walk around his home in the Morrumbala district in north-central Mozambique. The 60-year-old is HIV-positive, but because of a World Vision care giver, he's getting treatment and support.

People living on Bonthe Island in Sierra Leone have been cut off from the mainland since May in an effort to prevent transmission of the deadly Ebola virus. These travel restrictions have been successful in protecting people there from the disease, but they have also cut families off from vital markets. Their health has suffered as a result and some children are even showing signs of acute malnutrition. PHOTO: World Vision / Sarah Wilson
Mar 27, 2015

World Vision urges renewed focus on safe, dignified burials as lockdown ordered across Ebola-stricken Sierra Leone

On the eve of a three-day lock-down that will quarantine some 6 million people across Sierra Leone, World Vision is urging a renewed focus on safe and dignified burials to help eradicate the virus.

Children enjoy a nutritious meal at a World Vision program in Rwanda. PHOTO: World Vision / Ilana Rose
Mar 10, 2015

World Vision joins with other aid organizations to urge Congress to fund important work tackling poverty around the world

World Vision joins more than 150 other aid organizations in calling on Congress to support U.S funding to help reduce poverty around the world.

Elizabeth is a 38-year-old woman and a female burial worker living in the Bo District in southern Sierra Leone. She believes in sacrificial work-especially that of restoring the dignity of her fellow women who die to Ebola during the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone, despite heightened stigmatization of burial workers. PHOTO ©2014 World Vision / Sarah Wilson
Mar 3, 2015

Prioritizing needs of children critical to Ebola eradication and recovery

World Vision is urging global leaders attending the European Union High-Level Conference on Ebola in Brussels this week to offer increased support for children in affected West African countries. More than 8,000 children have been orphaned in Sierra Leone alone.

The University of Pittsburgh football team and World Vision partnered to build Ebola Caregiver Kits for health workers in Sierra Leone. PHOTO: Courtesy, University of Pittsburgh
Feb 26, 2015

University of Pittsburgh, World Vision build emergency kits for Ebola health workers

The University of Pittsburgh football team partnered with World Vision to build Ebola Caregiver Kits for staff in Sierra Leone. One of the students, Patrick Amara, was born in Sierra Leone and said he was happy to participate in the effort to help his country.

After Ebola, survivors and orphans face challenges
Feb 16, 2015

After Ebola, survivors and orphans face challenges

Aruma, 14, lost his parents, his elder brother, and three younger siblings to Ebola. He’s one of more than 11,000 children in West Africa who have lost one or both parents to the Ebola virus. World Vision is helping provide for the needs of children like Aruma.

Feb 12, 2015

Nutrition training empowers mother to keep her child nourished

When Fiston Kengawe was just 14 months old, his grandmother took him to the hospital, where he was diagnosed with acute malnutrition. World Vision works to help children suffering from malnutrition but also trains and educates families how to better feed and care for children like Fiston.

Fatima, 8, and her friend, Sathi, 7, live at a center for vulnerable children in Bangladesh. The center, run by World Vision, cares for children who are living on the streets or in local brothels with their mothers. PHOTO: Jon Warren / World Vision
Feb 10, 2015

Next week’s meeting at UN key moment for children, says World Vision

Ending extreme poverty is only going to be possible if governments gathered for next week’s post-2015 meeting focus efforts on reaching all children, especially those living in war, fragility and instability, World Vision said Monday.

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Fact Sheets and Extras

The Nutrition Barometer Report: Gauging National Responses to Undernutrition (PDF)

The Nutrition Barometer provides a snapshot of national governments’ commitments to addressing children’s nutrition, and the progress they have made. It looks at 36 developing countries with the highest levels of child undernutrition. The Barometer measures governments’ political and legal commitment to tackling malnutrition, as well as their financial commitment.

Child Health Now Report: Together We Can End Preventable Deaths (PDF)

“Child Health Now” is World Vision’s first global campaign focused on a single issue: reducing the preventable deaths of children under five. In the two minutes it will take you to read this description, more than 30 children under the age of five will die. This is more than just a problem facing the developing world. It’s a “silent” emergency. And it is, we believe, the greatest child rights violation of our time.

InterAction factsheet on maternal and child health (PDF)

In 1985, USAID and UNICEF launched an initiative to combat preventable childhood diseases. In the decades since, as a leading innovator and one of the largest donors to global maternal and child health efforts, the U.S., led by USAID, has played a vital role in the development and delivery of low-cost, high-impact interventions to improve the health of the most vulnerable children and mothers.

World Vision Int'l: Healthy Children for a Healthy World (LINK)

World Vision is committed to improving the health and nutrition of women and children in the areas in which it works, contributing to the global reduction of under-five and maternal mortality.

World Vision Int'l: Healthy and Strong (LINK)

Good health in early childhood, especially in the first 1,000 days from conception to their second birthday, is the foundation of a child’s wellbeing. It saddens us tremendously that every day more than 20,000 children under 5 will die of preventable causes.

USA Today: Edible gifts that give back (child health - LINK)

Purchase a packet or jar of Good Spread peanut butter (made in Georgia) and the company will donate therapeutic nutrition to a child in need. Good Spread partners with MANA (Mother Administered Nutritive Aid) and World Vision who distributes the Ready-to-use Therapeutic Food (RUTF) to malnourished children around the world.

HP Matter (Fast Company) Spotlight on mHealth: Mobile phone health technology (maternal health - LINK)

“This unprecedented access to mobile phones at the village level, it really does change the game,” says Sherrie Simms, head of global nonprofit World Vision’s mHealth efforts. “It’s like having a mini-computer in your hand that allows for a whole host of potential uses and applications for health education.”

Devex: 4 innovations on mHealth and POC devices (maternal health - LINK)

There has been much talk about innovations in mobile health technologies among the international aid community in recent years. But now there’s a new kid on the block: Point of care (POC). World Vision International is one of the in-country partners involved in implementing the POC CD4 testing.

Upworthy: Find out the fastest and saddest way to shrink a child's heart ... literally (hunger - LINK)

Approximately 805 million people in the world do not have enough food to lead a healthy active life. That's about 1 in 9 people on earth. And that stat gets even sadder when you understand all of the impacts of malnutrition on the body — especially on a child. See how World Vision recommends we catch world hunger and save the minds, hearts, and bodies of millions of children all around the world.

Chronicle of Philanthropy: Nonprofits and government agencies react to Obama's proposed budget (foreign affairs - LINK)

In a statement to the Chronicle of Philanthropy, Bob Zachritz, vice president for advocacy and government relations at World Vision U.S., said President Obama's proposed budget “makes a strong commitment to the international affairs budget, which will help partner organizations like World Vision meet the needs of the most vulnerable around the world.”

Fox News: As Ebola trials near, raising awareness in Sierra Leone is next task (Ebola - LINK)

World Vision, a Christian humanitarian organization, is one of three groups involved in a $250 million campaign called the Innovative Medicines Initiative that aims to accelerate the development and manufacturing of Ebola vaccines. In addition to working to facilitate the trial of the Ebola vaccines, World Vision is developing a mobile app to send alerts and information to West Africans.

The Wall Street Journal: The UN agency that bungled Ebola (LINK)

The Ebola outbreak has again revealed an international health system that lacks the plans and capabilities to fight an epidemic or pandemic. Atop the pyramid of this health system sits the United Nations’ World Health Organization, whose 1948 charter gives it “directing authority” for “international health work.” World Visionand other NGOs have a presence around the world. These are the players who increasingly lead transformations in global health, eclipsing the WHO and its model of statist solutions.

The New York Times: A depression-fighting strategy that could go viral (mental health - LINK)

When Ebola ends, the people who have suffered, who have lost loved ones, will need many things. They will need ways to rebuild their livelihoods. They will need a functioning health system, which can ensure that future outbreaks do not become catastrophes. And they will need mental health care. We sometimes imagine depression is a first-world problem, but it is just as widespread, if not more so, in poor countries, where there is a good deal more to be depressed about.