Teens rally to fight global hunger and human trafficking

This weekend, February 21-22, teenagers across the country will unite to fight global hunger through World Vision's 30 Hour Famine. World Vision is also launching Childhood Lost, an experience to raise awareness and resources to fight child trafficking.

By Amy Parodi, World Vision U.S.
Published February 19, 2014 at 01:30pm PST

This Friday, more than 60,000 teenagers from some 3,000 churches across the country will come together to fight global hunger through World Vision’s 30 Hour Famine.

Additionally, teen groups are engaging in the new Childhood Lost experience — an event to shine a light on the atrocity of human trafficking and its impact on children.

Youth going hungry so others don’t have to

Now in its 23rd year, The 30 Hour Famine brings together tens of thousands of teenagers to devote a weekend to fasting, prayer, and service to fight hunger. Forgoing food for 30 hours, teens spend a weekend, usually at a church, learning about the impact of hunger on children around the world and volunteering in their own communities.

Last year, participating teens raised more than $8 million last year to fight hunger through World Vision food and nutrition programs.

Since its inception in 1992, teens have raised nearly $170 million through the 30 Hour Famine.

While groups participate in the 30 Hour Famine throughout the entire year, many choose to participate during one of the two national dates of 2014: February 21-22 and April 25-26.

Childhood lost: Engaging young people in a response to child trafficking

This year, World Vision has also launched a new youth experience to raise awareness and resources to fight child trafficking and labor.

Childhood Lost revolves around a series of vigils during which students learn about human trafficking and the solutions that World Vision implements to prevent it before children are forced to be soldiers, laborers, or sex workers.

As part of the experience, a poverty simulation allows students to step into the shoes of a child and her family to face the nearly impossible decisions many children and families must make, and work through the possible outcomes.

Childhood Lost aims to raise $300,000 that will be used to assist 800 children by providing Child-Friendly Spaces — a safe place for children to learn, play, and recover from trauma.

“Youth are an incredibly powerful community,” says Leah Swindon, World Vision’s national director for youth mobilization. “These issues are new to many of them, but they so often respond with passion — and with action.

“Every year we see them make the world a bit better because of their commitment to bringing change.”

Three ways you can help

  • Thank God for the sacrificial giving spirit of a new generation of young people. Pray for a life-changing experience for these youth as they fast and volunteer.
  • Encourage youth in your church to participate in the 30 Hour Famine or Childhood Lost.
  • Make a one-time gift to help provide life-saving food and care. Your donation will help provide food, agricultural support, clean water, nutritional training, and other essential care to hungry children and families around the world.

Highlights

This weekend, World Vision’s 30 Hour Famine will rally more than 60,000 teenagers to devote a weekend to fasting, prayer, and service to fight hunger.

World Vision has also launched a new youth experience — Childhood Lost — to raise awareness and resources to fight child trafficking around the world.

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