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World Malaria Day: What's all the buzz about?

World Malaria Day: What's all the buzz about?


World Malaria Day is April 25. Malaria remains a leading cause of death among African children under 5.

April 2008

Appading, 4, is a World Vision-sponsored child who proudly displays her bed net, which protects her from being bitten by malaria-carrying mosquitoes while she sleeps.
Appading, 4, is a World Vision-sponsored child who proudly displays her bed net, which protects her from being bitten by malaria-carrying mosquitoes while she sleeps.
Photo ©2008 Paul Bettings/World Vision
Imagine you're lying in bed. Your one-room house sits surrounded by trees and grasslands in one of the most beautiful places on earth — the plains of East Africa.

The blackness outside is too dark to see. All your senses can make out are the sounds of the night. You can hear animals off in the distance, and your small children are sound asleep next to you, worn out from a hard day of play near the pond not far from your house.

All of a sudden, the sound you fear the most: A faint buzz that seems to be coming from nowhere. Then, it's silent. You tense. It starts again — this time closer, near your head. Then, it's silent again. You pray the prayer you've done so many times before, asking God to protect your family.

It's the silence that scares you the most, because the mosquito could have landed on one of your children.

Malaria kills a child every 30 seconds

The poor are the most affected, because they simply can't afford to prevent or treat the deadly killer that claims about 1 million children every year. Because 90 percent of malaria deaths occur in Africa, the disease has a disastrous impact on the continent's economy. However, most of these deaths could be prevented simply by providing treated bed nets and medication for pregnant mothers.

Malaria is a fully preventable and treatable disease, but it remains a deadly threat to children in Africa.
Malaria is a fully preventable and treatable disease, but it remains a deadly threat to children in Africa.
Photo ©iStockphoto.com/Douglas Allen

This is why we work to fight malaria worldwide. World Vision knows that the key to saving lives is raising awareness. We work to improve the home care of those suffering from malaria and to integrate malaria education into health training programs and health sensitization meetings.

An infrastructure built on education is essential for progress. We are teaching community caregivers how to recognize the signs of malaria and evaluate its severity, providing technical assistance and training and the use of innovative tools to help adults and youth learn early detection techniques. Among our initiatives, we help prevent malaria by promoting the importance of long-lasting, treated bed nets. We distribute these nets through health centers and provide low-cost treatment as an effective means of reducing cases of malaria among pregnant women.

In addition, World Vision is working right here at home to fight the disease worldwide by advocating for more attention and intervention from our government leaders on Capitol Hill.

Now, imagine you're lying in bed, and your children are tucked away underneath the safety of a treated bed net. But this time, instead of worrying about mosquitoes, you smile as you drift off to sleep, saying a prayer of thanksgiving.

What's all the buzz about malaria?

Read more about how World Vision is working to fight this killer of children:

  • A mom's heartbreak: Seven-year-old Lemashol, who suffers from malaria, is one example of why efforts to fight this child killer are critical and must be increased.
  • 'Netting' Africa's serial child killer: World Vision works to implement proven prevention measures, including the distribution of insecticide-treated bed nets.
  • Child advocates press Congress for funding: Securing funding to fight this disease is critical to achieving meaningful results. World Vision works with child advocates — including a Zambian caregiver, a corporate partner, and college students — to meet this objective.

Three ways you can help


>> Pray for children and families who suffer at the hands of malaria. Pray for the most vulnerable to receive the resources they need to prevent and fight this disease.
>> Help provide tools to fight malaria. Your gift will multiply 3 times in impact to provide insecticide-treated bed nets, medical supplies, and more to children and families at risk from malaria.
>> Send a message to Congress. Ask lawmakers to swiftly reauthorize the Global AIDS, TB and Malaria Bill to ensure that children are not left behind in the fight against malaria and global AIDS.

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World Vision
Phone: 1-888-511-6548
P.O. Box 9716
Federal Way,WA 98063-9716
© 2014 World Vision Inc.
World Vision, Inc. is a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. All donations are tax deductible in full or in part.