Maternal and Child Health

Media Contact :

Laura Blank
lblank@worldvision.org

p 646.245.2496

The Latest


Administration’s Budget Devastating for the World’s Most Vulnerable

Leading American humanitarian, development and health organizations working around the globe have analyzed the Administration’s proposed International Affairs budget for Fiscal Year 2018 (FY 2018) and have estimated that the impact of the proposed cuts would be devastating for the poorest and most vulnerable women, children, and families around the world, as well as for American interests.

Fact Sheets and Extras


Child Health Now Report: Together We Can End Preventable Deaths (PDF)

“Child Health Now” is World Vision’s first global campaign focused on a single issue: reducing the preventable deaths of children under five. In the two minutes it will take you to read this description, more than 30 children under the age of five will die. This is more than just a problem facing the developing world. It’s a “silent” emergency. And it is, we believe, the greatest child rights violation of our time.

InterAction factsheet on maternal and child health (PDF)

In 1985, USAID and UNICEF launched an initiative to combat preventable childhood diseases. In the decades since, as a leading innovator and one of the largest donors to global maternal and child health efforts, the U.S., led by USAID, has played a vital role in the development and delivery of low-cost, high-impact interventions to improve the health of the most vulnerable children and mothers.

World Vision Int'l: Healthy and Strong (LINK)

Good health in early childhood, especially in the first 1,000 days from conception to their second birthday, is the foundation of a child’s wellbeing. It saddens us tremendously that every day more than 20,000 children under 5 will die of preventable causes.

USA Today: Edible gifts that give back (child health - LINK)

Purchase a packet or jar of Good Spread peanut butter (made in Georgia) and the company will donate therapeutic nutrition to a child in need. Good Spread partners with MANA (Mother Administered Nutritive Aid) and World Vision who distributes the Ready-to-use Therapeutic Food (RUTF) to malnourished children around the world.

Upworthy: Find out the fastest and saddest way to shrink a child's heart ... literally (hunger - LINK)

Approximately 805 million people in the world do not have enough food to lead a healthy active life. That's about 1 in 9 people on earth. And that stat gets even sadder when you understand all of the impacts of malnutrition on the body — especially on a child. See how World Vision recommends we catch world hunger and save the minds, hearts, and bodies of millions of children all around the world.

Fox News: As Ebola trials near, raising awareness in Sierra Leone is next task (Ebola - LINK)

World Vision, a Christian humanitarian organization, is one of three groups involved in a $250 million campaign called the Innovative Medicines Initiative that aims to accelerate the development and manufacturing of Ebola vaccines. In addition to working to facilitate the trial of the Ebola vaccines, World Vision is developing a mobile app to send alerts and information to West Africans.

The Wall Street Journal: The UN agency that bungled Ebola (LINK)

The Ebola outbreak has again revealed an international health system that lacks the plans and capabilities to fight an epidemic or pandemic. Atop the pyramid of this health system sits the United Nations’ World Health Organization, whose 1948 charter gives it “directing authority” for “international health work.” World Visionand other NGOs have a presence around the world. These are the players who increasingly lead transformations in global health, eclipsing the WHO and its model of statist solutions.

The New York Times: A depression-fighting strategy that could go viral (mental health - LINK)

When Ebola ends, the people who have suffered, who have lost loved ones, will need many things. They will need ways to rebuild their livelihoods. They will need a functioning health system, which can ensure that future outbreaks do not become catastrophes. And they will need mental health care. We sometimes imagine depression is a first-world problem, but it is just as widespread, if not more so, in poor countries, where there is a good deal more to be depressed about.