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Home > About Us > Media Center > Maternal and Child Health

Maternal and Child Health

World Vision is committed to improving the health and nutrition of women and children in the areas in which it works, contributing to the global reduction of under-five and maternal mortality. Good health is the foundation of a child’s life. We aim to ensure mothers and children are well nourished, protected from infection and disease, and have good access to essential health services.

Media Contacts:

Laura Blank

p 646.245.2496

Subject Matter Experts:

Martha Newsome

The Latest

Up to the minute news, press releases, media and more.

Dr. Anne Peterson with World Vision testifies at a Senate Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on Ebola Wednesday.
Dec 15, 2014

World Vision health expert testifies at Senate hearing on Ebola

Dr. Anne Peterson, a public health expert who recently returned from West Africa, testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on gaps in the Ebola response and how local partners could better connect with the interfaith effort to stem the disease.

Neighbors wash their hands in a community in Sierra Leone hit by Ebola. PHOTO: Jonathan Bundu / World Vision
Nov 14, 2014

Prevention must be part of Ebola response plan, says World Vision

World Vision and a coalition of other faith-based and humanitarian organizations met Thursday with Vice President Joe Biden and White House Ebola Czar Ron Klain to build support for expanding its financial commitment to include both Ebola prevention and treatment.

More than 4,000 people are taking refuge at the airport of Bangui, the capital city of Central African Republic. PHOTO: World Vision / Bruno Col
Nov 13, 2014

As conflict drags on, children in Central African Republic suffering the most, says new report

More than 4,000 people are taking refuge at the airport in Bangui, Central African Republic. The airport is heavily protected by French and African forces, giving families some assurance of safety from the rampant conflict. 

Sierra Leone: Ebola closes schools, imperils students’ future
Nov 6, 2014

Sierra Leone: Ebola closes schools, imperils students’ future

Schools are closed in Sierra Leone because of the Ebola virus. Twelve-year-old Zainab worries about falling behind in learning. She and her mother say children may become dropouts or child brides if they are out of school for long.

Drought and food insecurity could lead to another famine in Somalia.
Oct 16, 2014

Somalia on brink of famine again as world celebrates World Food Day, says World Vision

Somalia is on the brink of famine again, as the world celebrates World Food Day.

Ebola crisis: World Vision staff, faith leaders fight to curb deadly virus
Oct 9, 2014

Ebola crisis: World Vision staff, faith leaders fight to curb deadly virus

In Sierra Leone, World Vision staff, with government officials and other agencies, are working to curb the deadly virus. Faith leaders are being equipped with messages on prevention and awareness, and we are helping them address hopelessness, fear, and stigma in the communities they serve.

Beginning today, September 22, "One City / One Cause / One Week" will rally the generous people of Seattle around a flash philanthropy campaign to build a clinic and hospital that will save thousands of women's and children's lives in Southern Zambia.
Sep 22, 2014

First-ever "flash philanthropy" day benefits rural hospital in Zambia

Beginning today, September 22, "One City / One Cause / One Week" will rally the generous people of Seattle around a flash philanthropy campaign to build a clinic and hospital that will save thousands of women's and children's lives in Southern Zambia.

Ebola Medical Supply Donation
Sep 18, 2014

World Vision, McKesson, other donors prepare massive shipment of medical supplies to support Sierra Leone health workers

Days before the government of Sierra Leone institutes a three-day quarantine to contain the spread of Ebola, World Vision will begin a massive delivery of 200 pallets of medical relief supplies.

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Fact Sheets and Extras

The Nutrition Barometer Report: Gauging National Responses to Undernutrition (PDF)

The Nutrition Barometer provides a snapshot of national governments’ commitments to addressing children’s nutrition, and the progress they have made. It looks at 36 developing countries with the highest levels of child undernutrition. The Barometer measures governments’ political and legal commitment to tackling malnutrition, as well as their financial commitment.

Child Health Now Report: Together We Can End Preventable Deaths (PDF)

“Child Health Now” is World Vision’s first global campaign focused on a single issue: reducing the preventable deaths of children under five. In the two minutes it will take you to read this description, more than 30 children under the age of five will die. This is more than just a problem facing the developing world. It’s a “silent” emergency. And it is, we believe, the greatest child rights violation of our time.

InterAction factsheet on maternal and child health (PDF)

In 1985, USAID and UNICEF launched an initiative to combat preventable childhood diseases. In the decades since, as a leading innovator and one of the largest donors to global maternal and child health efforts, the U.S., led by USAID, has played a vital role in the development and delivery of low-cost, high-impact interventions to improve the health of the most vulnerable children and mothers.

World Vision Int'l: Healthy Children for a Healthy World (LINK)

World Vision is committed to improving the health and nutrition of women and children in the areas in which it works, contributing to the global reduction of under-five and maternal mortality.

World Vision Int'l: Healthy and Strong (LINK)

Good health in early childhood, especially in the first 1,000 days from conception to their second birthday, is the foundation of a child’s wellbeing. It saddens us tremendously that every day more than 20,000 children under 5 will die of preventable causes.

USA Today: Edible gifts that give back (child health - LINK)

Purchase a packet or jar of Good Spread peanut butter (made in Georgia) and the company will donate therapeutic nutrition to a child in need. Good Spread partners with MANA (Mother Administered Nutritive Aid) and World Vision who distributes the Ready-to-use Therapeutic Food (RUTF) to malnourished children around the world.

HP Matter (Fast Company) Spotlight on mHealth: Mobile phone health technology (maternal health - LINK)

“This unprecedented access to mobile phones at the village level, it really does change the game,” says Sherrie Simms, head of global nonprofit World Vision’s mHealth efforts. “It’s like having a mini-computer in your hand that allows for a whole host of potential uses and applications for health education.”

Devex: 4 innovations on mHealth and POC devices (maternal health - LINK)

There has been much talk about innovations in mobile health technologies among the international aid community in recent years. But now there’s a new kid on the block: Point of care (POC). World Vision International is one of the in-country partners involved in implementing the POC CD4 testing.

Upworthy: Find out the fastest and saddest way to shrink a child's heart ... literally (hunger - LINK)

Approximately 805 million people in the world do not have enough food to lead a healthy active life. That's about 1 in 9 people on earth. And that stat gets even sadder when you understand all of the impacts of malnutrition on the body — especially on a child. See how World Vision recommends we catch world hunger and save the minds, hearts, and bodies of millions of children all around the world.

Chronicle of Philanthropy: Nonprofits and government agencies react to Obama's proposed budget (foreign affairs - LINK)

In a statement to the Chronicle of Philanthropy, Bob Zachritz, vice president for advocacy and government relations at World Vision U.S., said President Obama's proposed budget “makes a strong commitment to the international affairs budget, which will help partner organizations like World Vision meet the needs of the most vulnerable around the world.”

Fox News: As Ebola trials near, raising awareness in Sierra Leone is next task (Ebola - LINK)

World Vision, a Christian humanitarian organization, is one of three groups involved in a $250 million campaign called the Innovative Medicines Initiative that aims to accelerate the development and manufacturing of Ebola vaccines. In addition to working to facilitate the trial of the Ebola vaccines, World Vision is developing a mobile app to send alerts and information to West Africans.

The Wall Street Journal: The UN agency that bungled Ebola (LINK)

The Ebola outbreak has again revealed an international health system that lacks the plans and capabilities to fight an epidemic or pandemic. Atop the pyramid of this health system sits the United Nations’ World Health Organization, whose 1948 charter gives it “directing authority” for “international health work.” World Visionand other NGOs have a presence around the world. These are the players who increasingly lead transformations in global health, eclipsing the WHO and its model of statist solutions.

The New York Times: A depression-fighting strategy that could go viral (mental health - LINK)

When Ebola ends, the people who have suffered, who have lost loved ones, will need many things. They will need ways to rebuild their livelihoods. They will need a functioning health system, which can ensure that future outbreaks do not become catastrophes. And they will need mental health care. We sometimes imagine depression is a first-world problem, but it is just as widespread, if not more so, in poor countries, where there is a good deal more to be depressed about.