From the Field

Photos: Communities’ journeys to clean water

Young Kamama collects clean water from a World Vision kiosk in Kenya.

Hundreds of millions of people lack access to clean water. But World Vision is committed to reducing these numbers by bringing innovative water solutions to communities around the world. Below, World Vision photographers share photos of communities at various stages in their journeys to clean water.

Kenya

Children stop for a drink of clean water from a solar-powered water kiosk in Kalawa, Kenya. It works like a gas pump: People bring their jerry cans and ATM-like cards, press a button, and water flows. People here used to walk long distances for dirty water — it could take five hours to get to the river and back. World Vision installed three kiosks and 14 boreholes that have changed the travel time to five minutes for clean, clear water. (©2017 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

Mali

Djenidie residents in southern Mali dance to celebrate a World Vision well-drilling crew striking water June 5, 2017. This well marks World Vision’s 1,500th borehole drilled in Mali since 2003. Still, only 16 percent of Malians in rural areas have access to hand-washing facilities with soap. Only about 64 percent of people in rural areas like Djenidie have access to an improved water source. World Vision is focused on bringing access to clean water to more than 800,000 Malians between 2010 and 2020. (©2017 World Vision/photo by Chris Huber)

Bolivia

Rocio Lopez Orosco, 11, walks over a polluted stream in Colomi, Bolivia. Her family does not have clean water at their home, so she must walk to get it from a nearby ground well. “This is how we live,” Rocio says. As part of its child sponsorship program, World Vision will help improve access to clean water in her community, feed malnourished children, provide vocational training, and support schools with educational material. (©2015 World Vision/photo by Eugene Lee)

Cambodia

A family affected by flooding in Cambodia exudes relief after a World Vision water filter distribution. During the rainy season, flooded wells caused families like this one to temporarily lose access to clean water. (©2017 World Vision/photo by Oscar Durand)

Nepal

Sri Ram Baral stands next to a white tank, known as a ghaintas, in Hansapur, Nepal. World Vision taught Baral how to build rooftop rainwater collection systems and how to create a greenhouse that allows his family to easily grow nutritious vegetables. Now his vegetables and gardens can flourish. (©2012 World Vision/photo by Sunjuli Kunwar)

Honduras

A community in eastern Honduras pauses for prayer after working a long day to build a 60,000-gallon water tank. Six hundred men and women worked together for more than five months to construct the tank and dig 26 miles of trenches for the pipes. This January, the community celebrated as 3,000 people got clean water — some for the very first time, all due to hard work and answered prayers. Read more. (©2017 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

Clean Water

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Globally, World Vision has committed to reaching everyone, everywhere we work with clean water by 2030. The first country expected to cross the finish line is Rwanda. World Vision U.S. President Rich Stearns, who will retire at the end of this year, personally committed to the goal, aiming to raise $50 million to reach 1 million Rwandans in 2,000 communities with clean water.
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