VIDEO: Bed nets and the battle against malaria

World Vision’s Kari Costanza documents her night under a bed net — a crucial line of defense in malaria-prone regions where the preventable, treatable disease has already caused suffering and death for so many.

Published April 25, 2013 at 12:00am PDT

Malaria was eradicated in the United States more than 60 years ago; but in places like Mozambique, it continues to wreak havoc on families and communities who don’t have access to the resources they need to protect themselves from this preventable disease — like insecticide-treated bed nets.

Bed nets are inexpensive and effective tools in the fight against malaria. They repel disease-carrying mosquitoes that lurk while vulnerable families sleep, reducing illness and child mortality rates for entire communities. Best of all, they can last for up to four years.

Watch Kari as she spends a night in Mozambique under the net, recounting stories of children and families who have experienced immeasurable suffering because of a fully preventable disease. Then, honor World Malaria Day by joining World Vision as we work to stop this killer of children for good.

Learn more

Read more about World Vision’s work to address preventable causes of child deaths, like malaria.

Four ways you can help

Ask God’s protection to be upon those who are vulnerable to deadly malaria, and pray for the international will to eradicate this preventable disease.

Make a one-time donation to provide bed nets for vulnerable families. Your gift will provide long-lasting, treated nets to protect entire families while they sleep, as well as training on how to properly use the nets and prevent the spread of malaria.

Give monthly to support World Vision’s work to fight malaria. Your monthly donation will help reach even more children and families with anti-malaria interventions, like bed nets, medical care, prevention education, and more.

Contact your members of Congress today. Urge them to protect federal funding for global programs that fight poverty and diseases like malaria. These programs account for just 1 percent of the overall federal budget — but they have the ability to save countless lives.