Acela Miracle, 61, used to spend 12 hours each day chopping down trees to make charcoal in order to support her six children. Now she has a very successful vegetable garden, trains others in gardening, and instead of cutting down tress, she now plants cedars. Photo by Andrea Dearborn.
Acela Miracle, 61, used to spend 12 hours each day chopping down trees to make charcoal in order to support her six children. Now she has a very successful vegetable garden, trains others in gardening, and instead of cutting down tress, she now plants cedars. Photo by Andrea Dearborn.
Sustainable Charcoal
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Haiti has lost so many trees to charcoal making, the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republican can be clearly seen from space. So, Haiti has come up with another method of charcoal making that’s not only saving trees, it’s cleaning up neighborhoods. Garbage is collected each day from one of the largest slums in Port-au-Prince and taken to a new waste management factory. Recyclables are sorted out and sold to Canadian companies. Paper is then processed with sawdust into a compressed fuel briquette. It’s cheaper and environmentally friendly. Amelia Shaw reports.
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