Promising Practices in Gender Equality and Social Inclusion

Advancing gender equality and social inclusion (GESI) is critical to achieving World Vision’s mission of serving the most vulnerable. Producing evidence of impact that is GESI-responsive is core to this mission. The following promising practices provide evidence from World Vision programs in five countries on what works in integrating gender equality and social inclusion in our work.

Man holding baby

Bangladesh

This document presents a promising practice on integrating GESI into the
USAID-funded Nobo Jatra (New Beginning) project in Bangladesh, focused on improving gender equitable food security, nutrition, and resilience of vulnerable communities. GESI was considered a cross-cutting theme critical to the implementation of all project activities as well as an integral stand-alone pillar with targeted interventions on male engagement and youth development. This promising practice focuses on the evidence of impact on the extent to which male engagement activities resulted in GESI transformation.

Smiling woman

Malawi

This GESI promising practice focuses on World Vision’s Empowered Worldview programming in Malawi. Empowered Worldview is a faith-based behavior change approach to economic well-being that empowers resource poor households and communities for sustained well-being of children.

Smiling woman

Sierra Leone

The USAID-funded Women Empowered for Leadership and Development (WELD) program in Sierra Leone worked to empower women and advance their socio-economic and political leadership in Sierra Leone, working to address social and cultural barriers to women’s civic engagement and economic advancement. This promising practice present evidence suggesting the WELD project supported, empowered, and helped promote women’s social, political, and economic rights as well as equal and inclusive engagement.

Woman holding a baby

South Sudan

This promising practice shares evidence on the success of integrating GESI into the public healthcare system in Western Equatoria, South Sudan, through a Health Pooled Fund-funded project. The Evidence suggests that the project strengthened the health system and referral mechanisms at all levels of health care and improved the health status of women, children, and other vulnerable groups, including persons with disabilities and survivors of gender-based violence.

Children

Zimbabwe

This document presents the WASH UP! Girl Talk program, funded by Dubai Cares Foundation, as a promising practice in integrating GESI into water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programming in Zimbabwe. The project empowered primary school-aged children (pre-adolescent and adolescent girls and boys) to practice and promote healthy WASH behaviors, particularly around menstrual health and hygiene.