Change Makers

These 5 kids grew up to be global citizens

Vinh Chung grew up to be a global citizen.

As technology connects the world, becoming a global citizen rooted in God’s love is now more important than ever.

That means thinking beyond our own needs and experiences to understand how interdependent the world is. It’s also about becoming a multiplier — using what God has blessed you with to pay it forward.

Dr. Jackson Ole Sapit went from growing up as the son of a wealthy Maasai warrior to a life of poverty at age 4 when his father died. World Vision sponsored him through his education, and now he’s using that knowledge to spiritually counsel the Anglican Church of Kenya as the new archbishop.

Jimmy Morales‘ father died when he was 3, leaving his mother with three children to take care of on her own. With World Vision’s help, Jimmy and his siblings attended school. Now he’s the president of Guatemala and working to turn around the country after an era of government corruption.

Children who grew up to be global citizens:

Vinh Chung

Denisse Pariona Lunasco

Dr. Jose Nicolas Ramirez

Charitable Giving

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All around the world boys and girls learn teamwork, coordination, and endurance by playing the world’s most popular sport — the game we in the U.S. call soccer and the rest of the world calls football.
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Photos: Kids play football around the world

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Latin America/Caribbean

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Former sponsored child grows up to change community for better.
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A former sponsored child’s unquenchable thirst for service

In 2010, after a massive earthquake, Cholera returned to Haiti after more than 100 years. Children in a World Vision Child-Friendly Space and Early Childhood Center learned about cholera (spelled kolera in Haitian Creole) and practiced handwashing to avoid contracting the disease. Haitian health officials reported in October 2018 that more than 819,000 people had been infected and nearly 10,000 had died since the outbreak began.
From the Field

What is cholera? Facts, FAQs, and how to help