From the Field

Video: Schoolgirls share their poem ‘Dear Water’

It can be easy to take clean water for granted here in the United States. Just turn on your tap. But for millions of children around the world, not having easy access to clean water robs them of time, energy, health, and opportunity. It means so much to these schoolgirls in Kenya that they wrote a poem — “Dear Water” — to share how life-changing it is:

Dear water,
It was hard to get to you.
Waking up at dawn
Buckets on our heads
Donkeys loaded with jerrycans.
Miles we walked
In the scorching heat
To look for you.
Dear water,
At last you came.
Sweet water
Our backs are rested
The miles are no more
Diseases are gone.
For you are closer to us.
Dear water,
You are such a blessing.

What you can do

  • Learn more about clean water and how you can be part of the movement to end the global water crisis by 2030.
  • Join us in praying that more and more communities would have clean water access, and thank God for the access to clean water gained by this community.
  • Walk or run the Global 6K for Water on May 16, 2020, to provide life-changing clean water to one person in need. You’ll walk or run with the picture of the child receiving clean water through World Vision’s water projects.
  • Give a monthly gift to provide clean water to communities lacking it. Your ongoing gift creates lasting change in a community.

Clean Water

View All Stories
Miracles abound in the story that World Vision staff member Elizabeth Botts shares about finding joy alongside grief.
Change Makers

Walking the Global 6K in honor of my son

A woman’s hand holds a cutout and hand-colored drawing of a Peep in an orange cape. It’s how one of her students sees her.
Change Makers

Student sees his teacher — a Team World Vision runner — as a hero

Africa

View All Stories
Two Malawian girls in school uniforms can study safely thanks to World Vision’s work to reduce malaria in students.
From the Field

Falling malaria cases give way to education in Malawi

María wraps her arms around her daughter, Dayana, while she reads to her.
From the Field

An ode to mothers