From the Field

How’d they do that: Drip irrigation

World Vision teaches farmers how to use readily available materials to create a homemade bottle drip irrigation system. Try this in your own garden!

World Vision is taking huge strides to increase the accessibility of clean water for people in Rwanda and around the world. But in a country known as the land of a thousand hills, it’s nice for farmers to eliminate a few trips to water their plants.

A drip irrigation system works especially well on small plots of land, such as family gardens. This simple, effective solution frees farmers from frequent trips to get water, and it can also be made using supplies readily available in most African homes.

Here’s how farmers in Rwanda build their own drip irrigation systems:

1. Find and wash a plastic bottle.

 

2. Remove the lid and use a nail to poke a couple holes in the lid. (The more holes, the faster the water will run out.)

 

3. Fill the bottle with water, and replace the cap.

 

4. Dig a hole next to the plant you want to water.

 

5. Insert the bottle cap-side down. When the water runs low, refill.

 

Did you try your hand at drip irrigation? We want to see your finished product! Send your photos to us at editor@worldvision.org, or tag us @worldvisionusa on Instagram or Facebook.

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