Voices

Syrian refugee children write a letter to the world

Help Syrian refugees like Rahaff, 5, who escaped from Syria five months ago.

Like American children, refugee children have big dreams for their futures. Twelve of them wrote an open letter to the world, sharing their current realities and the suffering they’ve experienced in Lebanon after being forcibly displaced from Syria. They also expressed their dreams and hopes that their world can be restored with the help of those who care.

Syrian refugee children’s letter to the world

We are children from Syria; some of us came to Lebanon two years ago, and others came three or four years ago.

We suffer from many problems; one of them is being beaten by others.

For example, in the school, we are beaten by Lebanese students. In the streets, we are beaten as well and some people make fun of us. A friend and his brother are sometimes beaten by the owner of the house where they live.

We also suffer from big economic problems. For instance, there is someone in the group whose brothers sell tissues in the street to bring money to help their parents. But sometimes Lebanese children steal the tissues from them or the money they gained from the selling. Some children cannot register at the school due to economic conditions and others because they lack legal papers.

Despite all this, we still have dreams. Our dreams are like the dreams of all other children.

We hope that no one will beat us on the road, in the neighborhood, at school, or at home. We hope that no one will speak to us in a bad way, and we would like to be treated by the Lebanese and the Syrians in a good way.

In Syria, we used to live in a house, and we live now in a tent.

We wish to go back to our homes and our country, and that the war is over and that our parents can find a job to work just like any other parents.

We also dream that the truth will come to light in order to go back to Syria and all the problems will be over. Coming back to Syria is like the re-entry to paradise.

All of us have dreams for the future:

  • I dream to become a football player and help people through sports. (Ahmad)
  • I dream to be a doctor in the future. (Haitham)
  • I dream to be a professor. (Muhannad)
  • I also dream to become a teacher. (Fatima)
  • I would love to become a police officer to help people. (Wael)
  • I would love to become president in order to help everyone. (Madiha)

Finally, we want to thank you for all your efforts and your concern about us. Thank you for coming here and helping us, and we wish if you can make all our dreams come true. We would like that this message could reach all decision-makers in the world in order to help us in achieving our dreams.

—Noah, Mouhanned, Thanaa, Doha, Wael, Hiba, Fatima, Madiha, Ahmad, Saleh, Haitham, Ahmad

How to help Syrian refugee children

Syrians fleeing conflict in their country often leave everything behind. So they need all the basics to sustain their lives: food, clothing, healthcare, shelter, and household and hygiene items. Refugees also need reliable supplies of clean water, as well as sanitation facilities. Children need a safe environment and a chance to play and go to school.

You can help Syrian refugees by praying for them, using your gifts for their benefit, and learning more about the Syrian refugee crisis.

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