earthquake disaster relief and response ©World Vision
earthquake disaster relief and response ©World Vision

Disaster Relief

More than 90 percent of disaster-related deaths occur in developing countries. World Vision already works in these hard places, responding with life-saving speed when disaster strikes. Your support helps bring immediate disaster relief and supplies, and long-term recovery so people can rebuild their lives.

2017 Hurricane Harvey: Facts, FAQs, and how to help

Hurricane Harvey kicked off the historically destructive 2017 storm season and became the second-most costly hurricane to hit the U.S. mainland since 1900.

Iraq conflict: Facts, FAQs, and how to help

Why are millions of people displaced in Iraq? Conflict has created an extreme humanitarian crisis. Learn what World Vision is doing to help the children and families affected.

Syrian refugee crisis: Facts, FAQs, and how to help

Now in its ninth year, the Syrian refugee crisis is the largest refugee and displacement crisis of our time. Because of the Syrian civil war, 6.7 million people have fled Syria as refugees, putting a strain on the region’s ability to cope, and another 6.2 million people are displaced within Syria.

170
emergencies responded to by World Vision in 2017 globally.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world.

490,000
adults and children around the world who learned disaster risk reduction in 2016 & 2017.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world.

11.4 million
people affected by emergencies around the world who received assistance in 2017.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world.

Our Disaster Response Approach

How quickly does World Vision respond to a disaster, and what is your immediate response?

When disaster strikes, World Vision adopts a “first-in, last-out” approach: We first respond with life-saving emergency aid, and then we stay for the long term to help families recover and rebuild.

  • Within the first couple of hours after a disaster, World Vision staff members closest to the disaster respond with reports on the level of severity and need.
  • Within 24 to 72 hours of the disaster, our global rapid response team is on the ground, making assessments and beginning to provide emergency relief.
  • Within 72 hours of the disaster, our pre-positioned relief supplies are loaded up, transported, and distributed from local and international warehouses.
  • For the first week, we continuously distribute emergency aid and relief to residents affected by the disaster.

Over the following month, we work to help families stabilize by providing assistance with temporary shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene, child protection activities, healthcare, and economic opportunities.

How do you help residents recover from the trauma of disaster over the long term?

We are quick to respond to disasters, but we also focus on helping to rebuild the lives of disaster-affected families and communities over the long term. Large-scale disasters often leave hundreds of thousands of people homeless and vulnerable.

While emergency relief is necessary and saves lives, it is not enough. We help disaster survivors by assisting their transition from relief mode to recovery and rebuilding mode. This recovery and rebuilding phase involves a transition to permanent housing, clean water, sustainable sources of food, access to education, and re-established livelihoods.

When disaster strikes, which World Vision employees respond?

World Vision’s Global Rapid Response Team brings together international disaster experts from around the world, who are deployed within hours of a major emergency to support local teams and communities. The global rapid response team includes relief managers, program officers, and specialists in health and nutrition, human resources, finance, logistics, security, food aid, child protection, information technology, and communications — all working as a team to provide effective emergency relief.

In a large-scale response, World Vision collaborates with the United Nations and other local aid agencies. This collaboration helps avoid duplication, maximize efficiencies, ensure all needs are met, and eliminate gaps in humanitarian response.

How do you prepare to make sure you’re ready when an emergency occurs?

Having a disaster response fund ready to use, pre-positioning supplies like non-food items, and having staff prepared and trained to respond to emergencies is increasingly important to how we respond to disasters.

The global pre-positioning resource network is our designated team that makes sure we’re prepared to respond rapidly to any disaster anywhere in the world. The team pre-positions the supplies and develops preparedness plans, programming standards, logistic assessments, and logistic plans.

The supplies are ready to go in seven different warehouses that are strategically located all around the world. These relief supplies are ready for up to 225,000 beneficiaries at any time, ensuring that those affected by disasters will have emergency supplies distributed to them quickly and efficiently.

Disaster Response Resources

Guidance for building a balanced Design, Monitoring, Evaluation, Research and Learning system in a post response recovery (pdf)

Our Response to the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan (pdf)

Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines in late 2013—this report details the first two years of World Vision’s response.

2016 Nepal Earthquake Report (pdf)

The April 2015 earthquakes in Nepal left 2.8 million people in need of assistance. Read about our response and ongoing work.

More than 90 percent of disaster-related deaths occur in developing countries. World Vision already works in these hard places, responding with life-saving speed when disaster strikes. Your support helps bring immediate disaster relief and supplies, and long-term recovery so people can rebuild their lives.

2017 Hurricane Harvey: Facts, FAQs, and how to help

Hurricane Harvey kicked off the historically destructive 2017 storm season and became the second-most costly hurricane to hit the U.S. mainland since 1900.

Iraq conflict: Facts, FAQs, and how to help

Why are millions of people displaced in Iraq? Conflict has created an extreme humanitarian crisis. Learn what World Vision is doing to help the children and families affected.

170
emergencies responded to by World Vision in 2017 globally.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world.

490,000
adults and children around the world who learned disaster risk reduction in 2016 & 2017.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world.

11.4 million
people affected by emergencies around the world who received assistance in 2017.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world.

Our Disaster Response Approach

How quickly does World Vision respond to a disaster, and what is your immediate response?

When disaster strikes, World Vision adopts a “first-in, last-out” approach: We first respond with life-saving emergency aid, and then we stay for the long term to help families recover and rebuild.

  • Within the first couple of hours after a disaster, World Vision staff members closest to the disaster respond with reports on the level of severity and need.
  • Within 24 to 72 hours of the disaster, our global rapid response team is on the ground, making assessments and beginning to provide emergency relief.
  • Within 72 hours of the disaster, our pre-positioned relief supplies are loaded up, transported, and distributed from local and international warehouses.
  • For the first week, we continuously distribute emergency aid and relief to residents affected by the disaster.

Over the following month, we work to help families stabilize by providing assistance with temporary shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene, child protection activities, healthcare, and economic opportunities.

How do you help residents recover from the trauma of disaster over the long term?

We are quick to respond to disasters, but we also focus on helping to rebuild the lives of disaster-affected families and communities over the long term. Large-scale disasters often leave hundreds of thousands of people homeless and vulnerable.

While emergency relief is necessary and saves lives, it is not enough. We help disaster survivors by assisting their transition from relief mode to recovery and rebuilding mode. This recovery and rebuilding phase involves a transition to permanent housing, clean water, sustainable sources of food, access to education, and re-established livelihoods.

When disaster strikes, which World Vision employees respond?

World Vision’s Global Rapid Response Team brings together international disaster experts from around the world, who are deployed within hours of a major emergency to support local teams and communities. The global rapid response team includes relief managers, program officers, and specialists in health and nutrition, human resources, finance, logistics, security, food aid, child protection, information technology, and communications — all working as a team to provide effective emergency relief.

In a large-scale response, World Vision collaborates with the United Nations and other local aid agencies. This collaboration helps avoid duplication, maximize efficiencies, ensure all needs are met, and eliminate gaps in humanitarian response.

How do you prepare to make sure you’re ready when an emergency occurs?

Having a disaster response fund ready to use, pre-positioning supplies like non-food items, and having staff prepared and trained to respond to emergencies is increasingly important to how we respond to disasters.

The global pre-positioning resource network is our designated team that makes sure we’re prepared to respond rapidly to any disaster anywhere in the world. The team pre-positions the supplies and develops preparedness plans, programming standards, logistic assessments, and logistic plans.

The supplies are ready to go in seven different warehouses that are strategically located all around the world. These relief supplies are ready for up to 225,000 beneficiaries at any time, ensuring that those affected by disasters will have emergency supplies distributed to them quickly and efficiently.

Disaster Response Resources

Read the Haiti Earthquake Report (pdf)

The 2010 Haiti earthquake affected more than 3 million people — one of every three. World Vision’s initial response over the first year focused on food, shelter, water, and sanitation. Two years later, World Vision transitioned to helping Haitian families rebuild lives and recover livelihoods.

Read the Japan Tsunami Report (pdf)

After the 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster in Japan, World Vision responded with relief items; established community kitchens in evacuation centers; and set up Child-Friendly Spaces. The recovery and rehabilitation phase of the response also incorporated an expansion of support to children; the recovery of livelihoods in the fishing industry; child-focused disaster preparedness; and support to Fukushima evacuees.

Ways to Give to Disaster Relief

Be a Refugee Responder: $30+

As a Refugee Responder, your monthly gift will provide life-saving essentials like food, water, healthcare, child protection, and education to refugees and internally displaced people, helping to fill the gap of everything they’ve left behind.

Give to the Disaster Relief Fund: $50+

When disaster strikes, World Vision is there. We respond immediately with life-saving help and supplies, and then stay long term to support families as they recover and rebuild. By giving to the Disaster Relief Fund, you’ll help us respond to more than 80 disasters each year.

Ways to Give to Disaster Relief

Be a Refugee Responder: $30+

As a Refugee Responder, your monthly gift will provide life-saving essentials like food, water, healthcare, child protection, and education to refugees and internally displaced people, helping to fill the gap of everything they’ve left behind.

Give to the Disaster Relief Fund: $50+

When disaster strikes, World Vision is there. We respond immediately with life-saving help and supplies, and then stay long term to support families as they recover and rebuild. By giving to the Disaster Relief Fund, you’ll help us respond to more than 80 disasters each year.

Together, we work to help communities develop the perfect recipe for sustainable success.

Choose one and see how our work gets done.

Health

Poverty in America

Economic Empowerment

Clean Water

Education

Christian Faith

Disaster Relief

Child Protection

Gender Equality

Disability Inclusion

Refugees & Fragile States

Child Protection