Disaster Relief

More than 90 percent of disaster-related deaths occur in developing countries. World Vision already works in these hard places, responding with life-saving speed when disaster strikes. Your support helps bring immediate disaster relief and supplies, and long-term recovery so people can rebuild their lives.

2020 Hurricane Eta: Facts and how to help

Learn the facts about Hurricane Eta, which hit Central America as a Category 4 storm, and join us in prayer for people affected.

Iraq conflict: Facts, FAQs, and how to help

Why are millions of people displaced in Iraq? Conflict has created an extreme humanitarian crisis. Learn what World Vision is doing to help the children and families affected.

Syrian refugee crisis: Facts, FAQs, and how to help

Now in its 11th year, the Syrian refugee crisis is the largest refugee and displacement crisis of our time, with 13.5 million Syrians forcibly displaced. That’s more than half of the country’s population.

69
disasters and humanitarian emergencies in 72 countries responded to by World Vision globally, including the COVID-19 global health pandemic.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world in fiscal year 2020.

29 countries
where we work with the World Food Program to support 12 million people.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world in fiscal year 2020.

78.2 million
affected by emergencies around the world who received assistance.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world in fiscal year 2020.

Our Disaster Response Approach

How quickly does World Vision respond to a disaster, and what is your immediate response?



When disaster strikes, World Vision adopts a “first-in, last-out” approach: We first respond with life-saving emergency aid, and then we stay for the long term to help families recover and rebuild.
  • Within the first couple of hours after a disaster, World Vision staff members closest to the disaster respond with reports on the level of severity and need.
  • Within 24 to 72 hours of the disaster, our global rapid response team is on the ground, making assessments and beginning to provide emergency relief.
  • Within 72 hours of the disaster, our pre-positioned relief supplies are loaded up, transported, and distributed from local and international warehouses.
  • For the first week, we continuously distribute emergency aid and relief to residents affected by the disaster.

Over the following month, we work to help families stabilize by providing assistance with temporary shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene, child protection activities, healthcare, and economic opportunities.

How do you help residents recover from the trauma of disaster over the long term?



We are quick to respond to disasters, but we also focus on helping to rebuild the lives of disaster-affected families and communities over the long term. Large-scale disasters often leave hundreds of thousands of people homeless and vulnerable.

While emergency relief is necessary and saves lives, it is not enough. We help disaster survivors by assisting their transition from relief mode to recovery and rebuilding mode. This recovery and rebuilding phase involves a transition to permanent housing, clean water, sustainable sources of food, access to education, and re-established livelihoods.

When disaster strikes, which World Vision employees respond?



World Vision’s Global Rapid Response Team brings together international disaster experts from around the world, who are deployed within hours of a major emergency to support local teams and communities. The global rapid response team includes relief managers, program officers, and specialists in health and nutrition, human resources, finance, logistics, security, food aid, child protection, information technology, and communications — all working as a team to provide effective emergency relief.

In a large-scale response, World Vision collaborates with the United Nations and other local aid agencies. This collaboration helps avoid duplication, maximize efficiencies, ensure all needs are met, and eliminate gaps in humanitarian response.

How do you prepare to make sure you’re ready when an emergency occurs?



Having a disaster response fund ready to use, pre-positioning supplies like non-food items, and having staff prepared and trained to respond to emergencies is increasingly important to how we respond to disasters.

The global pre-positioning resource network is our designated team that makes sure we’re prepared to respond rapidly to any disaster anywhere in the world. The team pre-positions the supplies and develops preparedness plans, programming standards, logistic assessments, and logistic plans.

The supplies are ready to go in seven different warehouses that are strategically located all around the world. These relief supplies are ready for up to 225,000 beneficiaries at any time, ensuring that those affected by disasters will have emergency supplies distributed to them quickly and efficiently.

Disaster Response Resources

Venezuela 2 year report (pdf)
World Vision’s Venezuela response two years on has expanded to seven countries and reached more than 560,000 people with assistance in WASH, child protection, health, food security, livelihoods and education.

Syria 10 year report (pdf)
This report uses an evidence-base to show the incredible loss of human capital in Syria as a result of a continuous cycle of grave violations against children, heavy economic costs, and shattered opportunities for future generations.

More than 90 percent of disaster-related deaths occur in developing countries. World Vision already works in these hard places, responding with life-saving speed when disaster strikes. Your support helps bring immediate disaster relief and supplies, and long-term recovery so people can rebuild their lives.

2020 Hurricane Eta: Facts and how to help

Learn the facts about Hurricane Eta, which hit Central America as a Category 4 storm, and join us in prayer for people affected.

Iraq conflict: Facts, FAQs, and how to help

Why are millions of people displaced in Iraq? Conflict has created an extreme humanitarian crisis. Learn what World Vision is doing to help the children and families affected.

69
disasters and humanitarian emergencies in 72 countries responded to by World Vision globally, including the COVID-19 global health pandemic.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world in fiscal year 2020.

29 countries
where we work with the World Food Program to support 12 million people.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world in fiscal year 2020.

78.2 million
affected by emergencies around the world who received assistance.

Funded by World Vision donors around the world in fiscal year 2020.

Our Disaster Response Approach

How quickly does World Vision respond to a disaster, and what is your immediate response?



When disaster strikes, World Vision adopts a “first-in, last-out” approach: We first respond with life-saving emergency aid, and then we stay for the long term to help families recover and rebuild.
  • Within the first couple of hours after a disaster, World Vision staff members closest to the disaster respond with reports on the level of severity and need.
  • Within 24 to 72 hours of the disaster, our global rapid response team is on the ground, making assessments and beginning to provide emergency relief.
  • Within 72 hours of the disaster, our pre-positioned relief supplies are loaded up, transported, and distributed from local and international warehouses.
  • For the first week, we continuously distribute emergency aid and relief to residents affected by the disaster.

Over the following month, we work to help families stabilize by providing assistance with temporary shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene, child protection activities, healthcare, and economic opportunities.

How do you help residents recover from the trauma of disaster over the long term?



We are quick to respond to disasters, but we also focus on helping to rebuild the lives of disaster-affected families and communities over the long term. Large-scale disasters often leave hundreds of thousands of people homeless and vulnerable.

While emergency relief is necessary and saves lives, it is not enough. We help disaster survivors by assisting their transition from relief mode to recovery and rebuilding mode. This recovery and rebuilding phase involves a transition to permanent housing, clean water, sustainable sources of food, access to education, and re-established livelihoods.

When disaster strikes, which World Vision employees respond?



World Vision’s Global Rapid Response Team brings together international disaster experts from around the world, who are deployed within hours of a major emergency to support local teams and communities. The global rapid response team includes relief managers, program officers, and specialists in health and nutrition, human resources, finance, logistics, security, food aid, child protection, information technology, and communications — all working as a team to provide effective emergency relief.

In a large-scale response, World Vision collaborates with the United Nations and other local aid agencies. This collaboration helps avoid duplication, maximize efficiencies, ensure all needs are met, and eliminate gaps in humanitarian response.

How do you prepare to make sure you’re ready when an emergency occurs?



Having a disaster response fund ready to use, pre-positioning supplies like non-food items, and having staff prepared and trained to respond to emergencies is increasingly important to how we respond to disasters.

The global pre-positioning resource network is our designated team that makes sure we’re prepared to respond rapidly to any disaster anywhere in the world. The team pre-positions the supplies and develops preparedness plans, programming standards, logistic assessments, and logistic plans.

The supplies are ready to go in seven different warehouses that are strategically located all around the world. These relief supplies are ready for up to 225,000 beneficiaries at any time, ensuring that those affected by disasters will have emergency supplies distributed to them quickly and efficiently.

Disaster Response Resources

Venezuela 2 year report (pdf)
World Vision’s Venezuela response two years on has expanded to seven countries and reached more than 560,000 people with assistance in WASH, child protection, health, food security, livelihoods and education.

Syria 10 year report (pdf)
This report uses an evidence-base to show the incredible loss of human capital in Syria as a result of a continuous cycle of grave violations against children, heavy economic costs, and shattered opportunities for future generations.

Ways to Give to Disaster Relief

Give to Refugee Children’s Crisis Fund: $25+

Your monthly gift will provide life-saving essentials like access to healthcare, clean water and nutritious food along with emergency supplies and safe places for children to play and learn.

Monthly giving is the most effective way to help children and families who need it most. Plus, it lowers costs, which means more of your gift helps kids!

Give to the Disaster Relief Fund: $50+

When disaster strikes, World Vision is there. We respond immediately with life-saving help and supplies, and then stay long term to support families as they recover and rebuild. By giving to the Disaster Relief Fund, you’ll help provide essentials like clean water, emergency food, temporary shelter, health services, and more.

Ways to Give to Disaster Relief

Give to Refugee Children’s Crisis Fund: $25+

Your monthly gift will provide life-saving essentials like access to healthcare, clean water and nutritious food along with emergency supplies and safe places for children to play and learn.

Monthly giving is the most effective way to help children and families who need it most. Plus, it lowers costs, which means more of your gift helps kids!

Give to the Disaster Relief Fund: $50+

When disaster strikes, World Vision is there. We respond immediately with life-saving help and supplies, and then stay long term to support families as they recover and rebuild. By giving to the Disaster Relief Fund, you’ll help provide essentials like clean water, emergency food, temporary shelter, health services, and more.

Together, we work to help communities develop the perfect recipe for sustainable success.

Choose one and see how our work gets done.

Health

Poverty in America

Economic Empowerment

Clean Water

Education

Christian Faith

Disaster Relief

Child Protection

Gender Equality

Disability Inclusion

Refugees & Fragile States

Child Sponsorship