Hunger and food security

Due to regional conflicts, sharply rising costs, extreme weather events, and the social and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, an unprecedented number of people around the globe — 50 million in 45 countries — are threatened by hunger and starvation. Many poor farmers are unable to grow enough food to feed their own families, much less sell for additional income. We partner with communities to address immediate food needs — and also ensure they’re equipped for the future.

“At least I know my children will not go hungry”

Syrian refugees face the twin crises of skyrocketing food prices and limited work opportunities. To help, World Vision and the World Food Programme are partnering to support Syrian refugee parents through e-cards to help them more easily feed their families and maintain a sense of normalcy.

A Kenyan girl champions farming to fight food insecurity

Anita is only 11 years old, but she’s making a big difference in the fight against food insecurity in her Kenyan village. She is learning about sustainable farming practices that are resistant to weather extremes and growing diverse crops for that are nourishing her family of 11. With her growing knowledge, she’s encouraging and equipping her siblings and peers to improve the lives of their families.

The blessing chain

Animals provided in Guatemala through World Vision’s Gift Catalog program keep on giving after the initial gift. Through a program called Pasando la Bendición, or Passing the Blessing, more families in need receive animals that provide them with reliable nutrition and income.

We reached over 16 million people in the first six months of our current global hunger crisis response (April through September 2022).

In FY21, we used 163,172 metric tons of food to help nourish children and families in countries around the world.

We work in 40 of the 60 countries classified by global experts as “fragile” and especially susceptible to hunger.

Our deep relationships with USAID as well as partnerships at country and local levels enable us to reach the most remote locations and serve the people in greatest need.

Our approach to overcoming hunger

What is World Vision doing to address hunger around the world?


In April 2022 we launched our largest humanitarian undertaking ever in response to the global hunger crisis. Our 18-month response is focused on delivering life-saving aid to 22 million people in 26 countries where hunger is at its worst.

We work to equip children and families with the means to overcome hunger and achieve food security, which means they know where their next meal is coming from — and that it will be enough nutritious food to live an active, healthy life.

Specifically, we help hungry children and families by:

  • Delivering emergency food aid during crises
  • Increasing agricultural productivity through improved seeds and farming practices
  • Improving access to markets so farming families can profitably sell their surplus food
  • Teaching families and communities how to improve nutrition and dietary diversity
  • Managing resources in a sustainable way to prevent soil erosion, maintain soil fertility, use water more efficiently, and protect the environment

How does World Vision help families grow their own food more sustainably?



We help farmers increase their productivity by:
  • Helping them get improved, locally adapted seeds and tools and sustainable access to clean water
  • Teaching more productive agricultural practices such as promoting diversified and integrated farming systems, including livestock
  • Training families about better post-harvest storage and processing techniques to ensure more food is preserved and less is wasted
  • Bringing farmers together in associations and cooperatives, so they have more bargaining power and better access to markets and business development services, including credit, allowing them to graduate from subsistence to commercial farming

What if there’s a famine? Do you distribute aid?



We deliver emergency food aid to make sure children and families get essential nutrients during times of acute crisis. At the same time, we help families strengthen and improve their ability to produce or purchase their own food. This approach helps families become more resilient and better equipped to handle future food challenges.

How does teaching families and communities about nutrition help?


Rural families often grow or raise their own food. They may rely on crops and animals that grow locally, as well as traditional recipes that may not create balanced nutritional meals. We train volunteers to help families and communities learn about nutritious, appropriate crops to grow; small animals that are easy to raise; new recipes; and how to cook variations on local recipes in order to provide more nutritious meals.

We focus on ensuring nutrition for pregnant and lactating mothers, as well as mothers of children under the age of 5, who are most vulnerable to the long-term impacts of malnutrition. Mothers also learn to recognize signs of malnourishment among their children, and what to do if they detect it.

As a result of these programs, children and families are healthier, have more energy, and get sick less often.

Food and agriculture resources

Mainstreaming Nutrition Within Food Systems

World Vision co-authored this series of technical publications on maximizing nutrition outcomes within food systems.

Building Community Resilience to Climate Shocks

Resilience strategies underpin the work of many agencies working in complex, fragile environments. This case study describes the experience of World Vision’s USAID project in Zimbabwe on the matter.

Farming as a Business (FAAB) Manual for Smallholder Farmers

The USAID-funded ENSURE project in Zimbabwe developed this manual to promote farming as a viable and sustainable business.

Due to regional conflicts, sharply rising costs, extreme weather events, and the social and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, an unprecedented number of people around the globe — 50 million in 45 countries — are threatened by hunger and starvation. Many poor farmers are unable to grow enough food to feed their own families, much less sell for additional income. We partner with communities to address immediate food needs — and also ensure they’re equipped for the future.

10 world hunger facts you need to know

Around the world, global hunger and food insecurity are on the rise due to economic shocks, extreme weather events, conflict, and more. As many as 828 million people — approximately 10% of the world’s population — regularly go to bed hungry. Explore 10 facts about the challenging issues of global hunger and food insecurity, including the impacts that the war in Ukraine and other conflicts and crises have had on food supply and how vulnerable populations are at risk.

Hunger crisis forces Afghan parents to sell children for food

At least 22.8 million people face a hunger crisis in Afghanistan, where parents are faced with the impossible choice of selling a child for food or seeing their families starve. Learn what World Vision is doing to help families affected by the Afghan hunger crisis.

Community health workers reduce child malnutrition rates in Zambia

In rural communities, women have to travel long distances to get basic healthcare. World Vision–trained community health workers help bridge the gap and provide care as well as education.

We reached over 16 million people in the first six months of our current global hunger crisis response (April through September 2022).

In FY21, we used 163,172 metric tons of food to help nourish children and families in countries around the world.

We work in 40 of the 60 countries classified by global experts as “fragile” and especially susceptible to hunger.

Our deep relationships with USAID as well as partnerships at country and local levels enable us to reach the most remote locations and serve the people in greatest need.

Our approach to overcoming hunger

What is World Vision doing to address hunger around the world?


In April 2022 we launched our largest humanitarian undertaking ever in response to the global hunger crisis. Our 18-month response is focused on delivering life-saving aid to 22 million people in 26 countries where hunger is at its worst.

We work to equip children and families with the means to overcome hunger and achieve food security, which means they know where their next meal is coming from — and that it will be enough nutritious food to live an active, healthy life.

Specifically, we help hungry children and families by:

  • Delivering emergency food aid during crises
  • Increasing agricultural productivity through improved seeds and farming practices
  • Improving access to markets so farming families can profitably sell their surplus food
  • Teaching families and communities how to improve nutrition and dietary diversity
  • Managing resources in a sustainable way to prevent soil erosion, maintain soil fertility, use water more efficiently, and protect the environment

How does World Vision help families grow their own food more sustainably?



We help farmers increase their productivity by:
  • Helping them get improved, locally adapted seeds and tools and sustainable access to clean water
  • Teaching more productive agricultural practices such as promoting diversified and integrated farming systems, including livestock
  • Training families about better post-harvest storage and processing techniques to ensure more food is preserved and less is wasted
  • Bringing farmers together in associations and cooperatives, so they have more bargaining power and better access to markets and business development services, including credit, allowing them to graduate from subsistence to commercial farming

What if there’s a famine? Do you distribute aid?



We deliver emergency food aid to make sure children and families get essential nutrients during times of acute crisis. At the same time, we help families strengthen and improve their ability to produce or purchase their own food. This approach helps families become more resilient and better equipped to handle future food challenges.

How does teaching families and communities about nutrition help?


Rural families often grow or raise their own food. They may rely on crops and animals that grow locally, as well as traditional recipes that may not create balanced nutritional meals. We train volunteers to help families and communities learn about nutritious, appropriate crops to grow; small animals that are easy to raise; new recipes; and how to cook variations on local recipes in order to provide more nutritious meals.

We focus on ensuring nutrition for pregnant and lactating mothers, as well as mothers of children under the age of 5, who are most vulnerable to the long-term impacts of malnutrition. Mothers also learn to recognize signs of malnourishment among their children, and what to do if they detect it.

As a result of these programs, children and families are healthier, have more energy, and get sick less often.

Resource Archives:

  • Africa’s Agricultural Potential: This infographic shows how Africa can address hunger and malnutrition while boosting livelihoods and promoting inclusive, sustainable growth.
  • Ultra Rice® test: World Vision and PATH conducted a field trial to test Ultra Rice® grains, generating data on its stability under real world transport and storage conditions, and the health impact (PDF) among African children.

Food and agriculture resources

Building Community Resilience to Climate Shocks

Resilience strategies underpin the work of many agencies working in complex, fragile environments. This case study describes the experience of World Vision’s USAID project in Zimbabwe on the matter.

Farming as a Business (FAAB) Manual for Smallholder Farmers

The USAID-funded ENSURE project in Zimbabwe developed this manual to promote farming as a viable and sustainable business.

Ways to support hunger relief and food security

Global Hunger Crisis Response

The largest global hunger crisis in modern history has left 30 million children dangerously malnourished, threatening their health, hope, and futures. World Vision is responding in 28 of the hardest-hit countries, and our track record is one of success. By the grace of God, over the last 10 years, 89% of the severely malnourished children we treated made a full recovery.

Thanks to donor contributions, combined with public grants from partnerships like these, every $1 you donate to Global Hunger Response delivers $5 in impact.

Become a Hunger Relief Partner

When you donate to the Hunger Relief Fund, you can help stop hunger for children and families around the world. No child should lack nutritious food, but 233.5 million children were malnourished in 2020, without considering the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

You can help ensure kids get the nutrition they need, addressing immediate food needs and empowering families to grow their own sustainable sources of food. And thanks to public grants, your gifts will multiply 15 times in impact!

Monthly giving is the most effective way to help children and families who need it most. Plus, it lowers costs, which means more of your gift helps kids!

Ways to support hunger relief and food security

Global Hunger Crisis Response

The largest global hunger crisis in modern history has left 30 million children dangerously malnourished, threatening their health, hope, and futures. World Vision is responding in 28 of the hardest-hit countries, and our track record is one of success. By the grace of God, over the last 10 years, 89% of the severely malnourished children we treated made a full recovery.

Thanks to donor contributions, combined with public grants from partnerships like these, every $1 you donate to Global Hunger Response delivers $5 in impact.

Become a Hunger Relief Partner

When you donate to the Hunger Relief Fund, you can help stop hunger for children and families around the world. No child should lack nutritious food, but 233.5 million children were malnourished in 2020, without considering the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

You can help ensure kids get the nutrition they need, addressing immediate food needs and empowering families to grow their own sustainable sources of food. And thanks to public grants, your gifts will multiply 15 times in impact!

Monthly giving is the most effective way to help children and families who need it most. Plus, it lowers costs, which means more of your gift helps kids!

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Choose one and see how our work gets done.

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