Kids from school are in a circle and playing together. One boy is in a wheelchair.
Kids from school are in a circle and playing together. One boy is in a wheelchair.

Disability Inclusion

Individuals with disabilities can face a lot of barriers — in their living environment, in the form of outdated laws and policies, and in the attitudes and prejudices of people in their community. We address all of these barriers. We go beyond offering direct services focused on individuals to address the big picture.

Group of women holding chickens and smiling for the photo.

Unlike the night our Savior was born, there was no celebration when Minakhsy Roul came into the world. She was born with only partial vision.

Girl is sitting on a wheelchair and doing her homework.

Read Shelby’s and Anne’s story, and see the transformative difference the right wheelchair has made in their lives as well as across their community.

Man is teaching kids.

Yaok was 9 when a small bomb exploded near him, killing his brother, Vangsith, and three other children. Yaok and two others were injured. To save his life, his right leg had to be amputated.

Access

  • Working to ensure equitable access to educational services and activities, including school clubs and programs
  • Working with schools to construct accessible classrooms and facilities

Inclusion

  • Integrating people living with disabilities into community life
  • Training for teachers in inclusive teaching methods to appropriately incorporate students with disabilities
  • Training for parents about how to care for children with disabilities

Reducing Stigma

  • Promoting the rights of individuals living with disabilities. Addressing and reducing stigma.
  • Empowering community members to become advocates for disability rights and children’s rights

Disability FAQs

What is your approach to disability access, inclusion, and stigma reduction?

We take a rights-based and social model approach to disability access, inclusion and stigma reduction. Working with local disabled people’s organizations, we develop programs that are inclusive of people with disabilities in their activities, monitoring and evaluation, and research.

How do you inspire change in the communities where you work?

We promote attitudinal and behavioral change through training, advocacy, and stakeholder engagement, and ensure that universal access is a part of all reconstruction and infrastructure work. Engaging those with disabilities throughout program design, implementation, and evaluation is key to the success of disability inclusion.

What does your work look like in the field?

In 2014, in addition to integrating disability considerations into education, child protection, health, economic development, water, and food and agriculture programming, we conducted disability-focused projects in 53 project area across 21 countries in all seven regions where we work.

Disability Resources

Best Practices in Disability Inclusion (PDF)

World Vision considers the most vulnerable populations as its key constituency and specifically engages people with disabilities in all aspects of programming. Because community development is the starting point, World Vision’s interventions are local, sustainable, and transformational. This makes World Vision uniquely placed to tackle the environmental, attitudinal, and institutional barriers that underlie exclusion of people with disabilities.

Project examples

Accelerating Core Competencies for Effective Wheelchair Service and Support (ACCESS)

In India, Nicaragua, Romania, El Salvador, and Kenya, World Vision implements the Accelerating Core Competencies for Effective Wheelchair Service and Support (ACCESS) project, which seeks to strengthen the wheelchair sector and ensure that all people with mobility limitations are able to access appropriate wheelchairs through qualified service providers to enjoy full participation in their communities. To achieve the ACCESS project goal, World Vision has partnered with 10 stakeholders across the five project countries. These organizations build the capacity of local partners to undertake proper wheelchair provision by providing training, equipment, supplies, and ongoing mentorship throughout the program, while World Vision conducts the community-based identification, social inclusion, and follow-up of clients who receive wheelchairs. This link between service provision and community development is the innovation of the ACCESS program.

TEAM project in vulnerable communities in Colombia

The TEAM project builds on World Vision’s 35-year presence in vulnerable communities in Colombia. The overall goal of this project is to enable more than 1,900 people with disabilities (PWD), especially women and girls, to attain and maintain maximum independence to fully participate in all aspects of life in Colombia. The program provides medical and rehabilitation services to PWDs, expands provision of assistive technologies, increases access to economic opportunities for PWDs and their caregivers, and trains rehabilitation service personnel. DPO sub-grantees provide support services through trained community workers to men, women and children with disabilities. Services include peer support networks, sports activities, referral networks, and support to exercise rights. The project enables communities to use World Vision’s Citizen Voice and Action methodology to hold government accountable where funding for products and service provision is inadequate.

Engaged, Educated, Empowered, Ethiopian Youth (E4Y) in Ethiopia

The Engaged, Educated, Empowered, Ethiopian Youth (E4Y) project aims to address exploitative child labor in Ethiopia by promoting education and vocational training opportunities, and enhancing livelihoods opportunities and access to social protection programs for youth and their households. This project targets male and female youth from 7,500 households in Ethiopia, and emphasizes inclusion of youth with disabilities while exploring opportunities for disability inclusion in the Ethiopian workplace. The project also focuses on education by challenging teacher perceptions of gender norms and disability, aiming to improve teachers’ ability to meet the specific needs of children with disabilities. Youth with disabilities will also be provided with the necessary adaptive devices to access education and training, such as eyeglasses, crutches and wheelchairs. Training venues are physically accessible and trainings include Braille and sign language support where needed.

All Children Reading: A Grand Challenge for Development

Launched in 2011 by USAID, World Vision, and the Australian Government, All Children Reading: A Grand Challenge for Development is an ongoing series of competitions that leverage science and technology to create and apply scalable solutions to improve literacy skills of early grade learners in developing countries. Round 2 (2014-2017) is funding 14 innovative pilot projects through its grant competition, including five projects that focus on enhancing reading outcomes for children with disabilities.  In 2016, All Children Reading also anticipates launching a prize competition, focused on the needs of children with disabilities. Read more about All Children Reading’s innovations for children with disabilities here.

Child Protection and Education Signature Initiatives

Through its Child Protection and Education Signature Initiatives, World Vision’s child protection and education efforts ensure girls and boys with disabilities are included in the decision‐making processes that affect their lives. We work with community leaders, parents, and other stakeholders to strengthen support systems for children with disabilities. The Child Protection and Education Signature Initiatives also focuses on inclusive education for children with disabilities. This includes access to schools, protecting children with disabilities from all forms of violence, and de-stigmatization. Furthermore, the campaign focuses on advocacy and awareness raising that lead to attitudinal changes. The Child Protection and Education Signature Initiatives prioritizes including children with disabilities in the community development process.

Traveling Together (PDF)

This one-day disability awareness training manual focuses on approaches, confronting barriers, and moving past excuses.

On the Road to Disability Inclusion (PDF)

A supplement to Travelling Together, this provides practical steps for disability inclusion.

The 8 Steps+ (PDF)

In wheelchair programming, collaboration is critical to success. This report seeks to highlight how organizations can make inroads with populations that have physical disabilities.

Individuals with disabilities can face a lot of barriers — in their living environment, in the form of outdated laws and policies, and in the attitudes and prejudices of people in their community. We address all of these barriers. We go beyond offering direct services focused on individuals to address the big picture.

Group of women holding chickens and smiling for the photo.

Unlike the night our Savior was born, there was no celebration when Minakhsy Roul came into the world. She was born with only partial vision.

Girl is sitting on a wheelchair and doing her homework.

Read Shelby’s and Anne’s story, and see the transformative difference the right wheelchair has made in their lives as well as across their community.

Man is teaching kids.

Yaok was 9 when a small bomb exploded near him, killing his brother, Vangsith, and three other children. Yaok and two others were injured. To save his life, his right leg had to be amputated.

Access

  • Working to ensure equitable access to educational services and activities, including school clubs and programs
  • Working with schools to construct accessible classrooms and facilities

Inclusion

  • Integrating people living with disabilities into community life
  • Training for teachers in inclusive teaching methods to appropriately incorporate students with disabilities
  • Training for parents about how to care for children with disabilities

Reducing Stigma

  • Promoting the rights of individuals living with disabilities. Addressing and reducing stigma.
  • Empowering community members to become advocates for disability rights and children’s rights

Disability FAQs

What is your approach to disability access, inclusion, and stigma reduction?

We take a rights-based and social model approach to disability access, inclusion and stigma reduction. Working with local disabled people’s organizations, we develop programs that are inclusive of people with disabilities in their activities, monitoring and evaluation, and research.

How do you inspire change in the communities where you work?

We promote attitudinal and behavioral change through training, advocacy, and stakeholder engagement, and ensure that universal access is a part of all reconstruction and infrastructure work. Engaging those with disabilities throughout program design, implementation, and evaluation is key to the success of disability inclusion.

What does your work look like in the field?

In 2014, in addition to integrating disability considerations into education, child protection, health, economic development, water, and food and agriculture programming, we conducted disability-focused projects in 53 project area across 21 countries in all seven regions where we work.

Disability Resources

Best Practices in Disability Inclusion (PDF)

World Vision considers the most vulnerable populations as its key constituency and specifically engages people with disabilities in all aspects of programming. Because community development is the starting point, World Vision’s interventions are local, sustainable, and transformational. This makes World Vision uniquely placed to tackle the environmental, attitudinal, and institutional barriers that underlie exclusion of people with disabilities.

Project examples

Accelerating Core Competencies for Effective Wheelchair Service and Support (ACCESS)

In India, Nicaragua, Romania, El Salvador, and Kenya, World Vision implements the Accelerating Core Competencies for Effective Wheelchair Service and Support (ACCESS) project, which seeks to strengthen the wheelchair sector and ensure that all people with mobility limitations are able to access appropriate wheelchairs through qualified service providers to enjoy full participation in their communities. To achieve the ACCESS project goal, World Vision has partnered with 10 stakeholders across the five project countries. These organizations build the capacity of local partners to undertake proper wheelchair provision by providing training, equipment, supplies, and ongoing mentorship throughout the program, while World Vision conducts the community-based identification, social inclusion, and follow-up of clients who receive wheelchairs. This link between service provision and community development is the innovation of the ACCESS program.

TEAM project in vulnerable communities in Colombia

The TEAM project builds on World Vision’s 35-year presence in vulnerable communities in Colombia. The overall goal of this project is to enable more than 1,900 people with disabilities (PWD), especially women and girls, to attain and maintain maximum independence to fully participate in all aspects of life in Colombia. The program provides medical and rehabilitation services to PWDs, expands provision of assistive technologies, increases access to economic opportunities for PWDs and their caregivers, and trains rehabilitation service personnel. DPO sub-grantees provide support services through trained community workers to men, women and children with disabilities. Services include peer support networks, sports activities, referral networks, and support to exercise rights. The project enables communities to use World Vision’s Citizen Voice and Action methodology to hold government accountable where funding for products and service provision is inadequate.

Engaged, Educated, Empowered, Ethiopian Youth (E4Y) in Ethiopia

The Engaged, Educated, Empowered, Ethiopian Youth (E4Y) project aims to address exploitative child labor in Ethiopia by promoting education and vocational training opportunities, and enhancing livelihoods opportunities and access to social protection programs for youth and their households. This project targets male and female youth from 7,500 households in Ethiopia, and emphasizes inclusion of youth with disabilities while exploring opportunities for disability inclusion in the Ethiopian workplace. The project also focuses on education by challenging teacher perceptions of gender norms and disability, aiming to improve teachers’ ability to meet the specific needs of children with disabilities. Youth with disabilities will also be provided with the necessary adaptive devices to access education and training, such as eyeglasses, crutches and wheelchairs. Training venues are physically accessible and trainings include Braille and sign language support where needed.

All Children Reading: A Grand Challenge for Development

Launched in 2011 by USAID, World Vision, and the Australian Government, All Children Reading: A Grand Challenge for Development is an ongoing series of competitions that leverage science and technology to create and apply scalable solutions to improve literacy skills of early grade learners in developing countries. Round 2 (2014-2017) is funding 14 innovative pilot projects through its grant competition, including five projects that focus on enhancing reading outcomes for children with disabilities.  In 2016, All Children Reading also anticipates launching a prize competition, focused on the needs of children with disabilities.

Every Last One Campaign

Through its Every Last One campaign, World Vision’s child protection and education efforts ensure girls and boys with disabilities are included in the decision‐making processes that affect their lives. We work with community leaders, parents, and other stakeholders to strengthen support systems for children with disabilities. The Every Last One campaign also focuses on inclusive education for children with disabilities. This includes access to schools, protecting children with disabilities from all forms of violence, and de-stigmatization. Furthermore, the campaign focuses on advocacy and awareness raising that lead to attitudinal changes. The Every Last One campaign prioritizes including children with disabilities in the community development process.

Give to Disability Inclusion

Donate to help children with disabilities: $29

Your monthly gift will help provide life-changing resources such as crutches, prosthetic limbs, and wheelchairs. It will also allow trained, local caregivers to meet critical needs of children with disabilities.

You’ll be easing the challenges for caregivers and providing compassionate, life-enhancing support for boys and girls who are precious in God’s sight.

Ship and deliver a wheelchair: $50

In developing countries, birth defects, land mines, and diseases such as polio, have left millions of children unable to walk.

Thanks to our partnership with Free Wheelchair Mission, you can empower a child with a custom-fit wheelchair and the hope for a better tomorrow. Your gift also helps provide prosthetics and rehabilitation for children.

Donate to help children with disabilities: $29

Your monthly gift will help provide life-changing resources such as crutches, prosthetic limbs, and wheelchairs. It will also allow trained, local caregivers to meet critical needs of children with disabilities.

You’ll be easing the challenges for caregivers and providing compassionate, life-enhancing support for boys and girls who are precious in God’s sight.

Ship and deliver a wheelchair: $50

In developing countries, birth defects, land mines, and diseases such as polio, have left millions of children unable to walk.

Thanks to our partnership with Free Wheelchair Mission, you can empower a child with a custom-fit wheelchair and the hope for a better tomorrow. Your gift also helps provide prosthetics and rehabilitation for children.

Donate to help children with disabilities: $29

Your monthly gift will help provide life-changing resources such as crutches, prosthetic limbs, and wheelchairs. It will also allow trained, local caregivers to meet critical needs of children with disabilities.

You’ll be easing the challenges for caregivers and providing compassionate, life-enhancing support for boys and girls who are precious in God’s sight.

Ship and deliver a wheelchair: $50

In developing countries, birth defects, land mines, and diseases such as polio, have left millions of children unable to walk.

Thanks to our partnership with Free Wheelchair Mission, you can empower a child with a custom-fit wheelchair and the hope for a better tomorrow. Your gift also helps provide prosthetics and rehabilitation for children.

Together, we work to help communities develop the perfect recipe for sustainable success.

Choose one and see how our work gets done.

Health

Poverty in America

Economic Empowerment

Clean Water

Education

Christian Faith

Health

Poverty in America

Economic Empowerment

Clean Water

Education

Christian Faith

Disaster Relief

Child Protection

Gender Equality

Disability Inclusion

Refugees & Fragile States

Disaster Relief

Child Protection

Gender Equality

Disability Inclusion

Refugees & Fragile States