From the Field

A Honduran community: What makes us happy

Nine-year-old twins Carlos Hernain and Carlos Joel hug their prized teddy bears, gifts from a visiting church team. The black bear is named Monkey, and the brown bear is Bear. The boys have been World Vision sponsored children for two years. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

What’s important to you? What makes you happy? What brings you joy?

If someone asked you to show them something that means a lot to you, what would you choose? Maybe something you made, or grew, or were given that shows what you’ve achieved. Or maybe an object that represents how you have been loved, encouraged, and understood.

In Yamaranguila, Honduras, people were photographed with the people, places, and things that represent their faith, family bonds, Indigenous culture, and hope for the future — what makes them happy.

My grandfather

Dina, a 19-year-old and World Vision–trained youth activist, loves spending time with her 70-year-old grandfather, Julian. He has always encouraged her to dream and make big plans. “I lived with my grandparents until I was 15, and he’s taught me so much,” she says. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My mother’s garden

Seven-year-old Adrianna climbs and romps among plants in her mother’s garden. It’s a magical setting for the girl, and a workplace for her mother, who grows flowering plants and bakes bread in an outdoor oven to sell every week. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My trophy

Mayor Jose Rodriguez, 37, proudly holds an Iberian-American award trophy that honors Yamaranguila’s outstanding progress in human development. After more than 20 years, World Vision is still a major contributor to development in Yamaranguila. “It’s one of the reasons why serving others is part of my life,” says the mayor, a former sponsored child. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My diploma

Arnol shows off the diploma he earned at a World Vision Parenting with Love training he attended with his father, Bernardino, and members of their church. “My dad is a good example to me. He said I should come and learn how to be a good person when I have kids,” Arnol says. Arnol helps by role-playing family issues when they teach the same class at their church.

Arnol shows off the diploma he earned at a World Vision Parenting with Love training he attended with his father, Bernardino, and members of their church. “My dad is a good example to me. He said I should come and to be a good person when I have kids,” Arnol says. Arnol helps by role-playing family issues when they teach the same class at their church. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My gifts from my sponsor

There’s no question that 7-year-old sponsored child Selvin’s favorite things are the Christmas gifts — a tiny car, yo-yo, and colored pencils — that he received from his U.S. sponsor, along with a letter and family photo. His younger brother Alex, 2, likes to get in on the action, too. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My soccer ball

Byron, 11, holds tight to his soccer ball. “It’s my favorite thing,” he says. Since their home is on a hillside, Byron’s dad cleared and leveled a small soccer field where Byron and his friends can play. In rural Los Mangos, the boys play every day after school and chores. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

Our teddy bears

Nine-year-old twins Carlos Hernain and Carlos Joel hug their prized teddy bears, gifts from a visiting church team. The black bear is named Monkey, and the brown bear is Bear. The boys have been World Vision sponsored children for two years. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My award

Patricia, 35, holds the Five-Star Citizen Award she received in 2019. Patricia, a member of the Lenca Indigenous group, was one of five people in the nation to be recognized by an anti-corruption council. Her dedication to community development started when she joined a World Vision training program at age 11 so that she could tutor and encourage. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My cornbread

Wearing a traditional handwoven headscarf, Syriaca Perez, 80, serves a plate of cornbread made from maize her family grew. She lives in Los Mangos surrounded by her children, including Patricia, and her grandchildren. Over her lifetime, Syriaca has seen lean times, but she’s also seen electricity, clean water, and better healthcare come to her community. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My lemons

Noe, Patricia’s 8-year-old son, proudly shows the lemons he and his cousins helped pick from their trees. The bigger boys climbed the tree and shook it, then Noe gathered up (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My Bible

Sarai’s parents are church planters, and she’s following in their footsteps as a Sunday school teacher for young kids. Her Bible is special to her and well used. Sarai’s favorite verse is Philippians 4:13: “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me” (NKJV). “In the most difficult moments people may fail, but God won’t,” says the 16-year-old. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My sash

Nahomy, 13, wears a sash as the elected youth mayor of Yamaranguila. “Being educated means that I can take care of my family and my community, especially my grandparents and father who have sacrificed so much to give me opportunities,” she says. “I want to be a doctor and start the first clinic in my community, La Puerta.” (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My school

“To me, being Lenca means preserving the culture so it won’t disappear,” says Ever, 16. Ever is an agroforestry student at the Lenca Institute secondary school, where he plays trumpet in an honors band. The Lenca Institute promotes Indigenous cultural values, including the importance of protecting the environment. The school has well-developed programs in traditional arts and crafts, and students grow vegetables in kitchen gardens. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My grandson

Ever’s mom, Carmen, 47, snuggles with her 3-day-old grandson, Kevin. Carmen was trained by World Vision as a volunteer child health monitor. “I’m training these mothers and my own daughters,” she says. She wants to make sure what she’s learned will continue to benefit her community and her grandson. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My community’s clean water

“I wash my hands,” sings Gladys, 3, as she shows her mother and other children in her family how it’s done. Though she’s in preschool, Gladys knows all about how and why you should wash your hands. With help from World Vision and other organizations, all of the 20,000 people in Yamaranguila have clean water piped to their homes and schools. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My bees

Friends and neighbors Felix and Roberto are volunteers with their community water committees and partners in a beekeeping business. “Bees need plants and flowers, but they also need water,” Felix says. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My family’s honey

Ariel, 6, eats honey when her dad, Felix, brings some home from the beehives. “I love the way it tastes,” she says. Her mother and grandmother put fresh honey and honeycomb in plastic containers and sell it. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

A photo of my sponsor

Yeymi, 15, carries something very special in her pocket: a picture taken a few years ago when her World Vision sponsor came to visit from the U.S. “I was so excited to meet him. I knew him from his photos,” she says. “He has really given me hope that I can go on and become a nurse.” (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

My strength

Eleven-year-old Eric flexes his muscles in Honduras. Thanks to World Vision’s work there, he is empowered and strengthened for the future.

Eleven-year old sponsored boy Eric (in blue), his brother Junror, 12 (in brown), and a neighbor compare their muscles. “I’m the strongest in my class,” says Eric. Eric helps his mom with chores around the house. PE is his favorite class at school, and he likes to play football with his buddies. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)

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