Children play on the banks of the Naf River in Bangladesh. Across the water is Myanmar, which many thousands of Rohingya fled to find refuge in Bangladesh. World Vision is working to help refugees and also opened an area program for the host community.

Throughout World Vision’s more than 70 years of work, our roots have run deep in helping where people are suffering, where poverty seems undefeatable, and where the needs are great. With God’s sustaining hand and faithful support from people like you, we were there in the wake of the Vietnam War with Operation Seasweep, sailing the South China Sea to pick up Vietnamese refugees that the world had turned its back on. We were there during the Ethiopian famine, feeding starving children and doing the much harder work of helping to establish long-lasting systems that have transformed lives and the region. We cried out for the church to respond when the AIDS crisis was creating orphans at an astonishing rate. We’ve been helping countless families since the Syrian civil war resulted in the largest refugee crisis of our day. And today, we’re responding to the crippling needs brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic in every country we work in while our staff are all equally affected by this crisis.

Syrian refugee children in Lebanon benefit from World Vision’s Child-Friendly Spaces and other programming work.
Syrian refugee children in Lebanon benefit from World Vision’s Child-Friendly Spaces and other programming work. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Maria Bou Chaaya)

In 2010, we embarked on a mission unlike any we’d ever undertaken. In the middle of a major economic crisis, we launched World Vision’s Campaign For Every Child (FEC). Our goal was to empower 20 million people worldwide with life-changing resources. We felt God calling us to make this bold move, and many of you felt the same call. Because God honored our joint efforts, this groundbreaking campaign had an incredible global impact. We exceeded our goals, reaching more than 25 million people — half of them children — in just five years.

A World Vision child protection program in Bangladesh helps program participants learn life skills — decision making, problem solving, and creative thinking.
A World Vision child protection program in Bangladesh helps program participants learn life skills — decision making, problem solving, and creative thinking. (©2018 World Vision/photo by Laura Reinhardt)

Each of these challenges seemed insurmountable — the numbers too big, the need too great. But World Vision instead said “together, we can do this, because this vision is from God.” He is our confidence who has guided us and provided for us for over 70 years. And He has stirred in your hearts and inspired you to be part of His great work of empowering children and families to raise themselves out of poverty so they can have life, hope, and a future — even amid crises like a global pandemic.

Bernard Kivuva is a World Vision community engagement and sponsorship officer in Kenya. He works with students, many of whom are sponsored and attend World Vision Bible clubs.
Bernard Kivuva is a World Vision community engagement and sponsorship officer in Kenya. He works with students, many of whom are sponsored and attend World Vision Bible clubs. (©2018 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)
A World Vision staff member in Ecuador provides food aid to Kassandra, a Venezuelan refugee and mother of six. Her family has struggled to have enough food because her husband, who works as a street vendor, cannot go to work because of the COVID-19 pandemic.
A World Vision staff member in Ecuador provides food aid to Kassandra, a Venezuelan refugee and mother of six. Her family has struggled to have enough food because her husband, who works as a street vendor, cannot go to work because of the COVID-19 pandemic. (©2020 World Vision/photo by Chris Huber)

And that’s why we’re not backing down, and instead we’re setting an even more audacious goal. At God’s prompting in late 2015, World Vision launched Every Last One (ELO) — a $1 billion capital campaign over eight years to reach more than 60 million people. It’s over twice as large as FEC was, and it builds on our global child sponsorship foundation — accelerating development in places where sponsorship projects already have a firm footprint. In these communities, campaign projects — funded by private donors and philanthropists — help us make an even bigger impact even faster, meeting a family’s needs through three areas of focus:

Students pray together at a Bible club meeting in Kenya. The students, many of whom are sponsored, learn Bible verses, sing, hear the Word of God, and plant and care for fruit trees through the ELO Christian discipleship program.
Students pray together at a Bible club meeting in Kenya. The students, many of whom are sponsored, learn Bible verses, sing, hear the Word of God, and plant and care for fruit trees through the ELO Christian discipleship program. (©2018 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)
Choity, 15, makes a dress using the sewing machine she received through an ELO child protection program in Bangladesh. She dropped out of school at age 13 to help support her family. The program helped children who were working return to school, or for those far behind like Choity, it provided life-skills training for safe work.
Choity, 15, makes a dress using the sewing machine she received through an ELO child protection program in Bangladesh. She dropped out of school at age 13 to help support her family. The program helped children who were working return to school, or for those far behind like Choity, it provided life-skills training for safe work. (©2018 World Vision/photo by Laura Reinhardt)

Come with us on a journey to discover what’s been accomplished so far. See the lives that have been transformed — both those of people here in the U.S. who said yes to God’s call to help, and those of the children and families we serve around the world. And continue the journey by partnering with us to make life, hope, and a future possible for every last one during a time when all three of those ideas seem questionable. The needs today are even greater because of the pandemic, but by the grace of God and with your compassionate generosity, we’re committed to empowering millions of children and families to transform their lives.

Lydia Atugonza, 23, holds her newborn daughter, delivered that night in a clinic funded by ELO in Uganda. With her first two children, she had to travel a long way to give birth and then go home right after. The clinic has delivery rooms with clean water as well as a new mothers room for her to stay.
Lydia Atugonza, 23, holds her newborn daughter, delivered that night in a clinic funded by ELO in Uganda. With her first two children, she had to travel a long way to give birth and then go home right after. The clinic has delivery rooms with clean water as well as a new mothers room for her to stay. (©2018 World Vision/photo by Jon Warren)
Arpine Sargsyan, center, leads a Caring for Equality training session in Armenia in 2017. The ELO program, which ended in 2018, taught the value that girls and women bring while uprooting deeply held ideas about gender roles in this traditionally patriarchal society.
Arpine Sargsyan, center, leads a Caring for Equality training session in Armenia in 2017. The ELO program, which ended in 2018, taught the value that girls and women bring while uprooting deeply held ideas about gender roles in this traditionally patriarchal society. (©2017 World Vision/photo by Laura Reinhardt)
Life ELO

Every human being deserves clean water and access to essential healthcare. Still, women and children in developing nations walk an average of 6 kilometers — 3.7 miles — each day to get bacteria-filled water. And a child under the age of 5 dies every seven seconds, mostly from preventable causes. That’s why World Vision is committed to reaching 25 million people with access to clean water and 2 million mothers and young children with health and nutrition services by 2023.

Water: From problems to prayers answered

Ireen gets water at the new borehole well installed in her community. Having clean water will be a game changer for her future.

Witness to transformation: A new purpose

Laura and Robert Abernathy teach Sunday school in Uganda during a 2016 visit.

Mother and child health: Changing lives in Zambia

Doreen and her children listen as Rhoda, a community health worker, educates them about better health practices in Zambia.
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Once people are healthy and have access to clean water, it opens up new possibilities and inspires hope. This is where World Vision builds on our work by integrating child protection initiatives and leading emergency response programs. When people are safe, it frees them from worry and creates space for spiritual nurture. Christian discipleship is the third component of our Hope work. Through these three initiatives, we’re aiming to reach 28 million people by 2023.

Child protection: From child marriage to freedom

Students at St. Elizabeth Girls Secondary School celebrate their culture with a traditional Pokot dance. A number of the students are there on scholarship, having fled home to escape child marriage and female genital mutilation.

Witness to transformation: A miraculous change

Margo Day smiles with a friend named Lillian during Margo’s 2014 trip to Kenya to celebrate an expansion of the school she funded. She initially met Lillian during a 2009 visit at the rescue center.

Child protection: Girls free to dream of brighter future

Bristy (center) and her classmates exercise in the school courtyard.

Child protection: Kenyan children embrace new tradition

With a joyous celebration, teens in rural West Pokot, Kenya, are leaving painful, dangerous female genital mutilation (FGM) and early marriage behind.

Christian discipleship: Youth pray passionately for their country

In Tegucigalpa, Honduras, a group of preteens and teenagers gather faithfully to pray for their community, nation, and each other.

Emergency response: Responding in one of the most remote places

The hospital ship Solidarity responding to crisis along the Amazon River

Emergency response: Citizens of nowhere

For 12 hours, we walk with 5-year-old Jannatul through what a typical day might look like for her as a Rohingya refugee child in a camp in Bangladesh.

Emergency response: Family sacrifices for boy

Teenager Armando left Venezuela with his family two years ago, but they still struggle find peace and stability, often going hungry so he can pursue their dream of becoming a lawyer.

Child protection: Protecting girls in Armenia

Emergency response: Girl excels in school after working

Jheyde, 13, is among more than 1 million Venezuelans in Colombia who left because of hunger and poverty. She finally found stability and success in school.
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As hope builds, people begin to dream of a brighter future. ELO’s Future work is centered around economic empowerment and education. World Vision’s award-winning Unlock Literacy program empowers parents and children to value education and its life-changing potential. And parents struggling to make ends meet gain the knowledge and tools to farm better, learn new skills, and gain access to financial services like loans and savings groups. Economic resilience is critical to helping families weather natural disasters and other emergencies like the COVID-19 pandemic, and it also helps them navigate unexpected expenses that life often brings without being financially devastated. Our aim through ELO is to brighten the futures of 5.4 million children and hardworking adults by 2023.

Economic Empowerment: From migrating to managing

Kenia in Honduras oversees the harvest and preparation for market of the family’s abundant tomato crop.

Education: Rwandan woman advocates for children's education

Dativa listens to Keza read a book that came from the World Vision’s reading camp Keza attends.

Witness to transformation: Finding God's purpose to fulfill

Sherrie Woodring listens to a roundtable discussion at a 2017 conference in California about the Every Last One campaign.

You can help make life, hope, and a future possible for every last one.